Tips for hurricane season

Minimizing the effects of the storm

Every year at this time, people in South Alabama brace themselves for another potentially destructive hurricane season. Hurricane season begun June 1 and continues through Nov. 30. The experts are predicting an above-average hurricane season. “Since we can’t stop hurricanes,” Manager Stan Wilson said, “the only thing we can do is work on being better prepared and know what to do in case one hits.” Clarke-Washington EMC is offering suggestions on what should be done to protect life and property if a hurricane threatens. Residents served by Clarke-Washington EMC in Clarke, Monroe, Washington and Wilcox counties are encouraged to consider these safety tips when a hurricane warning is issued.

CWEMC Employee Austin Roberts demonstrates how simple it is to secure windows during a storm

• Make plans for action: The best way to cope with a hurricane is to always be prepared for one. A hurricane warning is issued when hurricane conditions are expected in a specified area in 24 hours or less. If a warning is given, stay tuned to radio or TV for official bulletins. Use a battery-operated weather radio to stay informed. Charge cell phones, pagers, and other electronic devices. Secure lawn furniture and other loose material outdoors. Fill the bathtub with several days supply of drinking water. Turn up refrigerator to maximum cold and don’t open it unless necessary. Wedge sliding glass doors to prevent their lifting from their tracks. Check batteries in flashlights, stock up on canned foods and make sure you have. Windows should be secured with either tape, plywood or shutters.

• Stay or leave? When a hurricane threatens your area, you will have to make the decision whether to evacuate or ride out the storm in the safety of your home. If local authorities recommend evacuation, you should drive carefully to the nearest designated shelter using recommended evacuation routes. Turn off appliances to avoid any potential safety hazards when power is restored. Make sure the house is locked and the water and electricity is shut off at main stations. Leave food and water for pets, since many shelters do not allow them. Take small valuables with you, but travel light.

• Freezers/refrigerators: First, open the freezer door as little as possible. With a freezer that’s full, foods can stay frozen up to 72 hours. A half-full freezer can still keep food frozen up to 24 hours after the power goes out. Should the power stay off for several days, dry ice can preserve the food in the freezer.

First, open the freezer door as little as possible. With a freezer that’s full, foods can stay frozen up to 72 hours. A half-full freezer can still keep food frozen up to 24 hours after the power goes out. Should the power stay off for several days, dry ice can preserve the food in the freezer.

First, open the freezer door as little as possible. With a freezer that’s full, foods can stay frozen up to 72 hours. A half-full freezer can still keep food frozen up to 24 hours after the power goes out. Should the power stay off for several days, dry ice can preserve the food in the freezer.  

 

Be cautious: Stay away from downed lines. Do not drive over lines or under low hanging lines. Keep children and pets away from downed lines. Do not attempt to remove tree limbs or anything else caught in power lines. Call Clarke-Washington EMC at 1-800-323-9081 or a local law enforcement agency if downed lines are spotted. Stay clear of areas with fallen trees or debris where downed lines can be hiding. Stay away from areas where repair crews are working.

“Clarke-Washington EMC is committed to supply its consumers with dependable and safe service in all kinds of weather,” said Manager Wilson. “A hurricane is not a pleasant experience. Yet, staying safe and calm can make it an easier one.”

 

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